"It'd be a lot cooler if you did."-Dazed & Confused
Well, the McConaissance was fun while it lasted. After a promising start in the 90s, M Squared (as his friends call him) hit a bad patch with inane romantic comedies like "Failure to Launch" and fizzled adventure movies like "Sahara." But a few years later, he started showing up in interesting movies, gave a career high performance in "True Detective," and, to cap it all, won an Oscar for "Dallas Buyers Club." Since then, we're back to the more erratic M.M. In writer/director Harmony Korine's latest, he plays a role that probably many think he could do in his sleep: a free-spirited, flamboyantly dressed poet, hanging out in the Keys and blissfully indulging in weed, drink, and general dissolution. He has fun with the role, but it's a bit one note and veers into monotony. It seems he may be due for re-evaluation/redemption after a car accident and mischief that lands him in rehab, but nothing really changes or fazes him, which I guess is sort of a virtue? Korine doesn't so much make a film as a bunch of loosely connected scenes populated with a bunch of colorful characters, shot in a kind of day glo music video haze, and featuring an eclectic class, which includes Snoop Dogg, Isla Fisher, Zac Efron (with some truly terrible hair), Jimmy Buffett as himself (it's the role he was born to play), and Jonah Hill, using a thick as molasses Southern accent. When Martin Lawrence shows up as a dolphin tour captain, you're like, of course he does. I don't think it's as bad as most of the others make it out to be, and I do think Korine is a talented, if decidedly unfocused, filmmaker, but, like the song that plays on the soundtrack, you'll find yourself asking "Is That All There Is?" It can be seen as a sort of companion piece to his previous film, "Spring Breakers," which had a similar level of decadence, but a darker core and a more satiric spirit.

lukasevansherman's rating:
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